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  • Sports Medicine Clinic

  • Physical Therapy

    Health Services That Put You on the Road to Wellness


    Sports Medicine Clinic San FranciscoActive Release Technique (ART)

    A particular type of muscle work designed to release both tight muscles and tightness or adhesions in the connective tissue surrounding muscles and joints. Tension is applied in a specific location in the muscle and direction while the patient is actively moving the joint through the range of motion or often combined with flexion-distraction while patient is lying down.


    Trigger Point Massage

    Trigger points are small, very sensitive “knots” in a muscle which can often cause pain to be felt distant to where the actual trigger point is located, such as trigger points in neck muscles causing pain to be felt in the head or arms. They can be treated in several ways, one of which is to apply direct pressure to the point until the pain and muscle tightness subside.


    Sports Medicine Clinic San FranciscoRussian Stimulation

    Russian Stimulation is a specific form of electro-stimulation with a Symmetrical Biphasic Square waveform produced by dividing a 2500Hz carrier frequency into 50Hz packets. Originally developed by the Russian Olympic team for muscle mass enhancement, is now often used for muscle strengthening, muscle spasms & Edema reduction in the United States.


    TENS

    Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is a drug-free method of pain relief that has been used to treat a wide variety of muscle and joint problems, as well as many other painful conditions. TENS uses electrical impulses to stimulate the nerve endings at or near the site of pain, diminishing the pain and replacing it with a tingling or massage like sensation.


    Sports Medicine Clinic San FranciscoExercise Rehabilitation

    At our sports medicine clinic we will work with you to speed up your recovery, build your stamina and strength. Additional services include personal training, gait analysis, and foot esthetics custom-cast orthotics (inserts), can be constructed specifically to correct your foot mechanics. Orthotics can relieve arch and heel pain while properly aligning your body from the feet up.


    Foot Orthotics

    Custom-cast orthotics (inserts), can be constructed specifically to correct your foot mechanics. Orthotics can relieve arch and heel pain while properly aligning your body from the feet up.

     

    Plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common explanations of heel pain. It is caused by inflammation to the thick band that connects the toes to the heel bone, called the plantar fascia, which runs across the bottom of your foot. The condition is most commonly seen in runners, pregnant women, overweight people, and individuals who wear inadequately supporting shoes. Plantar fasciitis typically affects people between the ages of 40 and 70.

    Symptoms

    Plantar fasciitis commonly causes a stabbing pain in the heel of the foot, which is worse during the first few steps of the day after awakening. As you continue to walk on the affected foot, the pain gradually lessens. Usually, only one foot is affected, but it can occur in both feet simultaneously.

    Diagnosis

    To diagnose plantar fasciitis, your doctor will physically examine your foot by testing your reflexes, balance, coordination, muscle strength, and muscle tone. Your doctor may also advise a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or X-ray to rule out other others sources of your pain, such as a pinched nerve, stress fracture, or bone spur.

    Treatment

    At our sports medicine clinic the Treatment for plantar fasciitis includes medication, physical therapy, shock wave therapy, or surgery.

    Medications

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen are used to treat the inflammation and pain of plantar fasciitis, but they won’t cure the condition. Corticosteroids can also be used to ease pain and reduce inflammation. Corticosteroids are applied either as a topical solution in conjunction with a non-painful electric current or through injections to the affected area.

    Physical Therapy

    Stretching exercises for the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia are recommend to relieve pain and aid in the healing process. Sometimes application of athletic tape is recommended. In moderate or severe cases of plantar fasciitis, your doctor may recommend you wearing a night splint, which will stretch the arch of your foot and calf while you sleep. This helps to lengthen the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia for symptom relief. Depending on the severity of your plantar fasciitis, your physician may prescribe a store-bought orthotic (arch support) or custom-fitted orthotic to help distribute your foot pressure more evenly.

    Surgery and Other Procedures

    When more conservative methods have failed to reduce plantar fasciitis pain, your doctor may suggest extracorporeal shock wave therapy, which is used to treat chronic plantar fasciitis. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy uses sound waves to stimulate healing, but may cause bruises, numbness, tingling, swelling, and pain. When all else fails, surgery may be recommended to detach the plantar fascia from the heel bone. Few people need surgery to treat the condition.

    Home Remedies

    Stretching your plantar fasciitis is something you can do at home to relieve pain and speed healing. Ice massage performed three to four times per day in 15 to 20 minute intervals is also something you can do to reduce inflammation and pain. Placing arch supports in your shoes absorbs shock and takes pressure off the plantar fascia.

     

    Tennis Elbow

    Tennis elbow is actually a misnomer in that it occurs in roughly only five percent of people who play tennis. Anatomically, the cause of tennis elbow is repetitive use of the forearm extensor muscles, especially if they weren’t used much previously. Practically any occupation, sporting endeavor, or household activity that has repeated use of the forearm and wrist may lead to this condition. Certain activities and occupations are more commonly associated with tennis elbow, such as plumbing, painting, fishing, butchering, computer use, and playing certain musical instruments. Tennis elbow is most common in adults between the ages of 30 and 50, but can affect people of all ages.

    Symptoms

    People with tennis elbow complain of pain that expands from the outer elbow into their forearm and wrist. The pain primarily occurs where the tendons of your forearm attach to the bony areas on the outside elbow. In addition to pain, people with tennis elbow experience weakness that makes it particularly difficult to hold a coffee cup, turn a doorknob, or even shake hands. Tennis elbow can cause weakness when twisting or grabbing objects.

    Tests

    In many cases, your doctor can diagnosis tennis elbow simply by listening to you describe your symptoms, performing a physical examination, and learning about your lifestyle and activities. However, if your physician suspects other reasons like a pinched nerve, fracture, or arthritis are causing your pain, he may suggest X-rays, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), or Electromyography (EMG).

    Treatment

    Our sports medicine clinic will be able to determine if a misalignment in your spine, neck, or shoulders may be causing an overcompensation injury. In some cases, a basic chiropractic adjustment may be all your need to stop your symptoms of pain. Your chiropractor will also work with you to determine which activities may have caused your injury and will  have you rest your arm while refraining from the trigger activities. Your chiropractor will also likely tell you to apply ice to the outside elbow two or three times a day for two to three weeks. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, naproxen, or aspirin, help reduce pain and inflammation while your elbow is healing. Compression, by using an elastic bandage, is helpful to provide relief and prevent further injury. Lastly, elevating your elbow whenever possible will limit or prevent swelling.

    If rest and ice do not alleviate your tennis elbow symptoms, then a physical therapy plan is often the recommended next step. You will learn exercises to stretch and strengthen the muscles and tendons in your arm. Your chiropractor or physical therapist will also work with you to develop proper form and technique regarding the activity that was the likely culprit to developing your tennis elbow. Depending on the severity of the injury, your chiropractor or physical therapist may suggest you wear a brace or forearm strap, which will reduce stress on the injured tissue while it heals.

    Source: National Institute of Health and Mayo Clinic